Me and My Camera

Me and My Camera

I wanted to make a page about that/your special camera which stands out for you, may it be a pinhole camera, compact, analogue, TLR or New DSLR etc… and tell us why it’s you personally choice, what kind of image you love taking and why your camera allows you to do this, We are very excited to get your response. Upload a picture of your Camera/ You and your Camera or an image taken by your Camera and give a description (I have made the image margin 600px/600px so if they are larger they will be cropped to this margin),I have left a URL link box if you want to advertise your pictures or photographers website, looking forward to hear from you. (To upload just click on the link below this text) and have fun! Sincerely Brian 🙂



Comments

Me and My Camera — 25 Comments

  1. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    I have been taking pictures since 1944, in the beginning with a Nagel (6x9cm film), later with an Akarette (never heard of that brand again), and got hooked on photography with a Canon FTb with a nice, powerful lens. My digital life started again with Canon, many models, but now I love my 7D. For black and white pictures I still use the FTb.

  2. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    The camera that got me rerally interested in photograpahy in 1970ish was an Agfa folder (I have no idea as what model) which took 6×6 images. A wire ‘viewfinder’ and me not knowing what the two rings on the lens actually did (aperture and shutter speed, I now know). I ran it by guess work and did surprisingly well. Still a sucker for folding cameras – Voigtlander Vito II is my current favourite.

  3. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    A rookie like me has no business trying to comment on this one; a friend gave me a Nikon D3 as a ‘starter’ camera because he swore I had an eye for photography and thought I should give it a go. His notion of what constituted a beginner’s camera might not be grounded in reality– I was too intimidated by the darn thing to even take it out of it’s box for the first six months. I’ve had it since 2008 and I’m still only vaguely aware of half of what it does… but I’m getting there!

    Thoroughly enjoy reading the posts in this group. Thanks for letting me listen in.

    • Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      @Colleen Carnevale
      Well for a starter camera The Nikon D3 is a superb, a well loved camera with Nikon fans, you just have to keep it out of the box and continue snapping, looking at your website your friend was right 🙂

      • Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        @Brian Povlsen – too kind. 🙂 many thanks. box has been tossed, camera goes with me everywhere now.

  4. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Over the years I’ve owned many and the ones that stand out each had their own particular niche that I loved. The Hasselblad 501C and it’s Zeiss lenses were amazing but the Rollei 35 held a special place for its ultra compact qualities. Then there was the Leica for its sharp rangefinder focus and let’s not forget the Plaubel 6×9 with its huge negatives! Greats all in their own way.

  5. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    We are big fans of antique cameras
    here is our blog about some of our collections

    Hope you like it

  6. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    maybe a good picture is made from the photographer soul, his creativity, good dress sense, and in a little, but very little part form a camera….any camera

  7. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    I love them all, from my Nikon F3 with a 35 1.4 lens to my D3s. They all have a purpose in my work, that is fun and creative. A 3 month trip through South East Asia I carried A 503 CXI Blad with 3 prime lens, 2 backs and some extra, D2x with 12- 24 2.8, 28- 70 2.8, 70-200 2.8 and to top it off a F5 body. All where used in different areas and purpose, Yes it was a lot to carry but worth it. The only real hassle was the higher speed films in the airports.

  8. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    The Hasselblad H4D50, is simply the best camera I have owned. The H4D50 coupled with the 50 – 110mm Zoom caters for almost every shoot I do.
    Processing the images with Phocus, provides image quality second to none.

    • Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      I agree that Lecia M6 is a beautiful camera, all about function and design. I have used a M4 and M6 for over fifteen years or more. Prior to that, the M2.These cameras are like pieces of art. Well balanced, everything where you expect it to be and built with only quality and function in mind. The more you use them the better they perform. Recently I have invested in a Sony Nex7. Since I can use my Leica lenses with it, it creates an option that i am enjoying more that I expected.

  9. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    My favorite camera is a coffee can. No really, it is. I have used it to make more pinhole images than I can remember. I like it because there is absolutely nothing to it, yet it yields wonderful images. It is a one-shot, so I need to be very careful – I cannot machine gun my shots.

    Other than that, I would say that my Zone VI 4×5″ camera and my Nikon FM2N get the vast bulk of my shooting time, with my Nikon D70 filling in occasionally.

  10. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    My favorite camera is my Kodak Brownie Hawkeye. I was given this camera when I was 5 years old and it is why I became a photographer. Over the years I have had many current favored camers; my Nikon FTn, my Nikon F3s and currently my Nikon D7000s. I also collect cameras. It all started with that Kodak Brownie. The Hawkeye is a fixed focus, fixed aperature, fixed shutter speed, 2¼ inch square format camera with an optional flash attachment. But it takes sharp pictures on 620 or re-rolled 120 film and the contact prints are sharp, fine-grained and have high contrast. Over the years I’ve had many more capable cameras, but what the Hawkeye did was magic—it made me a photographer.

  11. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    I’m glad you like your Fuji and film, Brian.

    I’ve used a lot of cameras, all formats from 8″ x 10″ to 35mm and I’m now using my 12th digital camera. I’ve liked something about all of these, but nothing was as important as the pictures I made with each of them.

    These days, new cameras are introduced so frequently that it boggles the mind, and while the features are frequently impressive, none of them can make me see the world any better, respond more appropriately to my perceptions, capture the moment more reliably, or replace my artistic judgment.

    It’s not about the camera. It’s all about the image, which if captured at the right place and time, properly exposed and sensitively presented, succeeds in communicating in a way that moves an audience. Some people can do that with a pin-hole camera, others do it with a large format camera and the best optics money can buy. And, you almost never see a label in a museum or a credit line on a publication giving credit to the camera.

      • Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        I’ve been involved in several camera discussions recently, and have needed a forum in which to make that statement about the importance of the image. Thanks, Brian, for giving this old guy an opportunity to vent.

  12. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    My favorite camera is my Kodak Brownie Hawkeye. I was given this camera when I was 5 years old and it is why I became a photographer. Over the years I have had many current favored cameras; my Nikon FTn, my Nikon F3s and currently my Nikon D7000s. I also collect cameras. It all started with that Kodak Brownie. The Hawkeye is a fixed focus, fixed aperature, fixed shutter speed, 2¼ inch square format camera with an optional flash attachment. But it takes sharp pictures on 620 or re-rolled 120 film and the contact prints are sharp, fine-grained and have high contrast. Over the years I’ve had many more capable cameras, but what the Hawkeye did was magic—it made me a photographer.

  13. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    My Nikon D3, it´s my tool for the moment. But it will by traded in for the newcomer D4 when it will appear in mid may, hopefully.
    I it´s film one, it will be my old, worn and trusted Nikon F4. She´s been whit me since mid 90`s and still working…..

  14. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    I do not have a film camera, but would enjoy experimenting with a medium or large format, given the chance, mostly because Stephen Shore is a favourite photographer.

    My ‘favourite’ camera right now is the Panasonic Lumix gf2, a micro four thirds. I experiment with photography, building panoramas, seamless elevations of longer buildings, and lately discovering how height changes how and what we see in the world. I use five of the gf2’s to do this over twelve feet currently, but my first experiments were with an eight foot pinhole camera. The results are currently videos from which I grab screen shots, but the goal is to be able to capture static images once I get a trigger system figured out.

  15. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Thank you Brian. I had to get off of my Kindle Fire and get on my laptop to navigate back to this group. Concerning your discussion I currently use a Canon Rebel Xsi DSLR, it is a 12 MP. The kit lens is not very good, but the body has met my level of expertise until now. I have a 70- 300 mm telephoto that gives me excellent photos. My problem now is that I have been accepted to a gallery and need larger prints. I don’t know how many MP I need to go large without loosing resolution. I got my husband a Canon PowerShot SX40 is. The zoom is 35x optical so I find myself borrowing his and using both now. For a point and shoot it gives excellent photos. Thanks. Ginger

  16. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    My favourite camera is my Voigtlander Vitomatic II. It is 55 years old and a delight to use. I use it as a walk-around camera because it is light(ish), has a good lens (color Skopar) and is discreet. I use this for photographing around town.

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